Graduate Studies in Sustainable Heritage Development (GSSHD)

The Australian National University will be offering a master’s level course ( Graduate Studies in Sustainable Heritage Development) in conjunction with the Technology Conference. The course will begin online in July/August 2005, participants will attend the Technology Conference in Hyderabad.

The course will deal with the full range of Management, Technical
& Practical perspectives and will cover a range of topics
including:

  • Understanding digital heritage;
  • Understanding digital preservation;
  • Understanding digital preservation programs;
  • Accepting responsibility for digital preservation;
  • Managing digital preservation programs;
  • Promotion of the cultures of cooperation;
  • Deciding what to keep for the future use or reference;Working with producers;
  • Transfer of objects;
  • Metadata issues;
  • Managing rights;
  • Protecting data; and
  • Maintaining accessibility.

Reference:

Link: Technology Conference

Development Gateway Foundation

The Development Gateway Foundation is an enabler of development

The Development Gateway Foundation is an enabler of development, an independent not-for-profit organization conceived by World Bank President James Wolfensohn.Operations began in July 2001.

The organization utilizes powerful and affordable information and communication technologies (ICT) that were previously unavailable to:

  • Increase knowledge sharing;
  • Enhance development effectiveness;
  • Improve public sector transparency; and
  • Build local capacity to empower communities

    more information at :

  • Development Gateway Foundation
  • “Digital-Divide” leading to “Digital-Dividend”

    Digital divide is the result of various fissures (and not one faultline) that existed yesterday and continue to exist today.The most significant fissure today—one that will bear upon the way all the others play out—may be that between policymakers and the business community.

    If private business’s can help the penetraion and use of technology, then there is sure profits to be made. Private sector (in both developing & developed nations) in most cases are never willing to take the bold steps needed in this direction. Private sector is keen for the Govt. to do all the legwork and put everything in place..so that can go head and make the $$’s.

    In order to realize the digital dividend, the business community must form a new compact with the policy world. Policymakers in most cases have promoted the concept of “universal service” to ensure that income and geography are not insurmountable barriers to telecommunications access. The business community recognizes the economic efficiency of having as many people connected as possible, but it looks to the bottom line rather than social policy as the rationale for supporting network expansion. Joining these two principles can generate exponential growth in digital-technology penetration by virtue of both government support and private investment.

    A classic example of such cooperation in the past between “universal service” & profits is, the compact between AT&T and the Govt., this worked out only due to the perseverence of the AT&T chairman (1907 to 1919) leading to private-public sector cohesion. Result was a ubiquitous telephone network a source of both private profit and public good.

    The insights of Ethernet inventor Bob Metcalfe are equally compelling. “Metcalfe’s Law” states that the value of a network increases exponentially as it grows. Such a law applies geometrically to the digital dividend, which encompasses not one network but many.

    Linking the digital divide and the digital dividend is something that Luddites, technologists, egalitarians, globalists and free-market adherents need to agree upon if we are to achieve real-world results curbing digital divide.

    “Digital-Divide” leading to “Digital-Dividend”

    Digital divide is the result of various fissures (and not one faultline) that existed yesterday and continue to exist today.The most significant fissure today—one that will bear upon the way all the others play out—may be that between policymakers and the business community.

    If private business’s can help the penetraion and use of technology, then there is sure profits to be made. Private sector (in both developing & developed nations) in most cases are never willing to take the bold steps needed in this direction. Private sector is keen for the Govt. to do all the legwork and put everything in place..so that can go head and make the $$’s.

    In order to realize the digital dividend, the business community must form a new compact with the policy world. Policymakers in most cases have promoted the concept of “universal service” to ensure that income and geography are not insurmountable barriers to telecommunications access. The business community recognizes the economic efficiency of having as many people connected as possible, but it looks to the bottom line rather than social policy as the rationale for supporting network expansion. Joining these two principles can generate exponential growth in digital-technology penetration by virtue of both government support and private investment.

    A classic example of such cooperation in the past between “universal service” & profits is, the compact between AT&T and the Govt., this worked out only due to the perseverence of the AT&T chairman (1907 to 1919) leading to private-public sector cohesion. Result was a ubiquitous telephone network a source of both private profit and public good.

    The insights of Ethernet inventor Bob Metcalfe are equally compelling. “Metcalfe’s Law” states that the value of a network increases exponentially as it grows. Such a law applies geometrically to the digital dividend, which encompasses not one network but many.

    Linking the digital divide and the digital dividend is something that Luddites, technologists, egalitarians, globalists and free-market adherents need to agree upon if we are to achieve real-world results curbing digital divide.

    Three Imp characterstics of good ICT implementation.

    There is a great need for a sustainable & replicable model for integrating ICT into societies in an effective manner so that people can benefit from real access, but any such model will need all the stakeholders – business, government and people- working hand-in-hand. Akshaya, in my view (at least in concept) may turn out to be a good model for rest of the world.

    The underlying characteristics of a such a successful model are:

  • Good local partnership:
    Akshaya is fostering entrepreneurship in local community by entering into partnership with grass-root level entrepreneurs. This is expected to create jobs and help the telecenter sustain itself.

  • Community-based technology access points:
    Akshaya centers are with in 2kms of each other, so there is real physical access for all.

  • A localized “problem-solver” unit that provides services and support:
    Now this is some thing that is missing from the puzzle, in Akshaya project. Who will be the “problem-solver”? I think here lies an opportunity for a sharp entrepreneurial mind!

  • Cause of Digital Divide? vis-a-vis Akshaya Initiative

    n a larger scheme of things failure to bridge digital divide (DD), according to bridges.org are due to these three:

  • A failure of developmental Initiatives.
    Most ICT initiatives are not replicable and sustainable. Can Kerala successfully replicate & Sustain Akshaya from the pilot to a state wide initiative?, the answer more likely is Yes. If the initiators of Akshaya can manage to replicate and apply the lessons learned form the Saksharatha- literarcy- project then surely Akshaya could be successfully replicated accross the state and may even serve as a model to the world.

  • A failure of market forces.
    Entrepreneurship is the cornerstone of the success of grassroot initiative, take the case of micro-credit and any other grass-root developmental initiatives. They owe their success, to one factor- belief in the entrepreneurial spirit of the people. Projects cannot be sustained for the good of the society by Govt.’s money! coz most govt. initiatives are non-profit and hallmark of any sustainable and successful initiative is wealth generation for the people (users or providers of service).

  • A failure of the government.
    Lets wait and watch, to see if the state Govt.’s of Kerala can pull their act together and think in the longterm needs of the state and its citizens.

  • Reflections on Simputer — from emergic.com

    emergic.org, has some good reflections on the launch of simputer on 29th of this month.